A Request! Important!!! Ack!!

Didya look?

Heh.  I am filling in for Janet today. Late, but hey. It’s still daylight here on the Left Coast.

In the comments, please, list your favorite historical romances.  Up to, say, three. The ones where, if you were to be thrown into a dungeon (assume a source of light) you would not mind reading over and over in between taking breaks to tunnel your way out.

I would like to know if I’ve missed any great ones.

Thank you. I will tally the results later next week.

About carolyn

Carolyn Jewel was born on a moonless night. That darkness was seared into her soul and she became an award winning and USA Today bestselling author of historical and paranormal romance. She has a very dusty car and a Master’s degree in English that proves useful at the oddest times. An avid fan of fine chocolate, finer heroines, Bollywood films, and heroism in all forms, she has two cats and a dog. Also a son. One of the cats is his.
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17 Responses to A Request! Important!!! Ack!!

  1. Jane George says:

    So hard!

    When There is Hope by Jane Goodger. Sappy title, very fun time travel where the heroine dies in a car accident and is transported into the body of an 1890’s byotch who has a riding accident. She must convince her husband that she’s a changed woman!

    I also love Nora Roberts’ Sisters Island trilogy.

    And Jo Beverley’s Forbidden always gets me. When he brings her the puppy I cry every time!

  2. Jane George says:

    Oops, the Roberts’ books aren’t really historical.

  3. Diane Gaston says:

    I loved a traditional Regency called The Last Frost Fair, by Joy Freeman. And anything by Mary Blayney, because I love her quiet, elegant voice.

  4. M. says:

    Hmm.
    Mr Impossible by Loretta Chase seems appropriate, given the very funny dungeon scene.

    A Flame Run Wild by Christine Monson, a fantastically well-written story set during the Crusades with a fabulously untypical heroine and refreshingly sensitive and progressive treatment of the two warring religious sides.

    And because I do re-read it every few years: Crocodile on the Sandbank by Elizabeth Peters. One of the funniest books ever written.

  5. The Mysterious Miss M by the Divine One

    Simply Love by Mary Balogh

    Flowers from the Storm by Laura Kinsale

  6. librarypat says:

    It would be hard to select only 3 but these are mine:

    Really any of Julie Garwood’s historicals (her contemporary books are pretty good too). I guess my first choice would be THE SECRET and RANSOM.

    THE WOLF AND THE DOVE by Kathleen Woodiwiss

  7. Assuming a fairy God mother would deliver Risky books to supplement our list, I choose:

    1. Outlander by Diane Gabaldon. I have not read it yet (gasp). Given its length, I might need the time in a dungeon to read this epic story.

    2. Lynn Kurland’s A Garden in the Rain. The time traveling hero, Patrick, escaped from a dungeon so I might be able to find a way out by re-reading the book.

    3. Cathy Maxwell’s A Marriage Contract. It is the first romance book I read … and it is one that gave me hope after 9/11.

    If I may shamelessless plug my blog, I write about a historical look at September 11 through 7 centuries at:

    http://sosaloha.blogspot.com/2010/09/september-11-let-freedom-ring.html

  8. Erastes says:

    1. The Charioteer by Mary Renault, stunning, mind bending and utterly captivating

    2. False Colors by Alex Beecroft Nelson’s Navy

    3. Probably this one doesnt count, but Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy. If I could ever write something like that, that touched people the way that touched me, I’d die happy

  9. Jane O says:

    1. Mr. Impossible by Loretta Chase

    2. Much Ado About You by Eloisa James

    3. Guilty Pleasures by Laura Lee Guhrke

    (If I’ve been thrown into a dungeon, I don’t need any additional angst!)

  10. Late, but–

    Loretta Chase, Lord of Scoundrels
    Anne Sutart, To Love A Dark Lord
    Carla Kelly. Reforming Lord Ragsdale

    Thanks for filling in, Carolyn!

  11. Ah Carolyn, you are a cruel one. ONLY three? That is NOT fare 🙁
    I would start my solitude with Judith James’ “Broken Wing”; it is one of the best love stories ever written. Then I would realize that my particular tunnel needs more digging, so I’d go to Diane Gabaldoon’s “Outlander”, which is very close to my heart and tells the story of an older women/younger man (as I’m living it).
    Oh, but that tunnel is getting almost done, so I’m now picking up Laura Kinsale’s “Flowers from the Storm”, and this one is as much sad as it lifts my spirits.

    And now I’m done digging, sitting in beautiful sunshine and all the trees around me, finishing my adventure with (sorry, but I have hidden my fourth book) Jude Deveraux’s “A Knight in Shining Armor”, as I realize that all’s well that ends well:)

  12. Diane Gaston says:

    Oh, Louisa!!! How very nice of you to include Miss M.

    I, of course, would be very happy to be supplied with any books from the Riskies. I can see myself being very well entertained in that dungeon-with-good-lighting.

  13. Alison says:

    Heyer’s ‘The Tollgaye’, Stephanie Laurens ‘Scandals’ Bride’ and quie possibly ‘The Scarlet Pimpernel’.

  14. Judy says:

    Books by Diane Gaston, Anne Gracie, and Elizabeth Rolls.

  15. Lana says:

    My favorite three historicals would be

    The Perfect Rake – Anne Gracie
    The Rogue and the Rival – Maya Rodale
    It Happened One Autumn – Lisa Kleypas

    (but limiting it to three took a LOT of angsting…)

  16. Terri C. says:

    What a great topic! My favorites are:

    After InnocenceThe Game/Secrets/The Fires of Paradise/Firestorm by Brenda Joyce
    Night Fire/The Rebel Bride/Devil’s Embrace by Catherine Coulter
    Stormfire by Christine Monson
    Tiger’s Eye by Karen Robards

  17. Carolyn says:

    I guess I should pony up with my choices, huh?

    Slightly Dangerous, Mary Balogh
    To have and to Hold, Patricia Gaffney
    Outlaw in Paradise, Patricia Gaffney

    Then I would cheat and find a way to get anything and everything by Mary Renault. Maybe the prisoner next door would have them.

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